Examine: Morning folks much less more likely to develop breast most cancers

Share

New research conducted in the United Kingdom found that women who wake up earlier in the morning have a lower risk of developing breast cancer.

A study from the University of Bristol compared data on hundreds of thousands of data to find that morning people have a 40-48% lower risk of breast cancer.

"We also found some evidence for a causal effect of increased sleep duration and sleep fragmentation on breast cancer, assessed using objective measurements of sleep obtained from movement monitors worn by around 85,000 UK Biobank participants".

"The team used a method called "'Mendelian randomization", which uses genetic variants linked to potential risk factors (in this case, circadian rhythm) to determine whether or not there is a causal relationship between the risk factor and a particular disease (in this case, breast cancer). The findings, which were not peer-reviewed, were presented at the NCRI Cancer Conference in Glasgow, Scotland.

It said in a statement that the breast cancer awareness week was observed around the world in the month of October, as an annual global campaign organised by major breast cancer charities to increase awareness of the disease and to raise funds for research into its cause, prevention, diagnosis, treatment and cure.

Now, there's evidence to suggest that the gene mutation may be linked to an increase risk of breast cancer, with night owls more at risk than larks.

That's according to European researchers looking at International Genetic Data.

Trump Administration Moves to Restrict Asylum at US-Mexico Border
Claims have spiked in recent years, and there is a backlog of more than 800,000 cases pending in immigration court. And in the last five years, the number of those requesting asylum has increased by 2,000 percent, it said.

In 2018, it is estimated that 627,000 women passed away from breast cancer, that is approximately 15% of all cancer deaths among women.

"While these intriguing results highlight the need for further investigation, changing your sleeping habits is not as easily done as other proven risk-reducing choices, as they're often part and parcel with jobs, parenting, or other health conditions", Dr. Emma Pennery, clinical director at Breast Cancer Care, told The Independent.

The Medifem Multi-Specialist Hospital & Fertility Centre has rounded up a series of activities put together to mark Breast Cancer Awareness campaign in October.

Dan Damon has been speaking to one of the researchers, Professor Richard Martin - an expert in cancer epidemiology from the University of Bristol.

Dr Richmond and her colleagues are planning to investigate the mechanisms underlying the effects of different sleep characteristics on the risk of developing breast cancer.

So will a good night's sleep stop me getting cancer?

"We know already that night shift work is associated with worse mental and physical health".

Share