Schuette wins Michigan Republican governor primary - 8/7/2018 8:45:03 PM

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Strong feelings about President Donald Trump, a competitive governor's race and congressional retirements fueled what probably was record turnout for a MI primary, with more than half-million more people voting than in 2010 - the last time the governorship was open. That is almost 28 percent higher than the 1.7 million who turned out in 2002, which is believed to be the previous MI midterm primary record.

Analysts attribute the surge to angst over and backing for Trump along with a ballot that had a number of high-profile, high-dollar open races on both sides.

Gretchen Whitmer, the former Democratic leader of the MI state Senate, won the Democratic nomination for governor Tuesday night.

"We need to throw Bill Schuette a big retirement party come November", Whitmer told jubilant supporters in Detroit. "Not only am I eager to discuss the issues with you, I am willing to offer $10,000 to your campaign, today, for you to come on our Sunday special". Precincts then started to run low on ballots. Most GOP strategists believe that Kobach, who served on Trump's short-lived voter fraud panel, is so polarizing that he could lose to a Democrat in the fall - even in a state as red as Kansas.

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The Fredericton resident said he heard a series of "firecracker" sounds around 7 a.m. "Doors are locked and everybody's inside". Another police tweet said one person was taken into custody but gave no immediate details on where the incident occurred.

"She was in the Legislature fighting battles when there was no hope to win", said 45-year-old John Hetzler, of Grosse Pointe Woods, who noted that he might vote Republican but only if they rejected Trump.

Conservative commentator Ben Shapiro is challenging Democratic House candidate Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez to a debate - and offered to pump $10,000 into her campaign to make it happen.

"The blue wave, it's a thing". Democrats have hammered the administration across the state recently for Trump's protectionist steel tariffs, which they say are raising prices on everyday goods and hurting MI workers. We're aware of it.

Fred Woodhams, a spokesman for the MI secretary of state's office, said Tuesday's turnout was "drastically higher" than in past primaries, approaching 2.2 million voters. Slotkin, who has raised more money than Rep. Mike Bishop, said that particularly this year, voters are looking for candidates "who will no longer just kind of check the box on voting the right way" but are asking how they will defend their rights. John James and Sandy Pensler squared off in a GOP primary for the chance to face Democratic Sen.

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