Sark preparing to see meteor shower

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The shower is usually visible every year between July 17 and August 24 around the world, but it's especially impressive the nights of August 11, 12 and 13, when up to 200 "shooting stars" will cross the sky every hour.

Tiny pieces of debris that are around the size of sand grains hit the earth's atmosphere at around 132,000 miles per hour, causing a fantastical meteor shower each year.

Every year the Earth gets close enough to the comet Swift-Tuttle's orbit to draw its debris into our atmosphere, and this year the new moon will leave a dark sky for us to enjoy the meteor shower during the weekend, its peak.

If you want to wish upon a shooting star, this is your weekend. Tonight, there will be a few clouds around, but you should still be able to see the meteors!

The meteors can be traced to the Perseus constellation, from which they get their name, which will climb in the northeastern sky as the evening passes.

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Patience is key. It can take up to 45 minutes for your eyes to adjust to the dark for optimal viewing. Others are brighter and can appear to sail across our sky for several seconds, leaving a glowing smoke trail.

A glorious display of Perseid meteors is set to light up the skies over the United Kingdom tonight - though cloud is forecast in Cumbria.

As you can see from the video, green lights shoot across a star-filled sky in a truly awe-inspiring display.

You'll have a handsome view of one of nature's greatest shows.

To make the best of the meteors, observers should avoid built-up areas and try to find an unobstructed view to the east.

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