House Republicans to Question FBI Agent About Anti-Trump Texts

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Rep. Doug Collins, R-Ga., said FBI lawyer Lisa Page must provide answers about statements she made in texts between herself and FBI agent Peter Strzok, as part of House committees' investigation into bias at the Justice Department.

Minutes before he leveled his attack on Twitter against Strzok, the president also tore into Page for her reported plans to defy a subpoena from the House Judiciary Committee.

He added: 'If she wants to come plead the Fifth, that's her choice.

"A subpoena to testify before Congress is not optional, it's mandatory", Ryan said. During the 2016 presidential campaign they exchanged text messages that suggested they would take whatever action was necessary to prevent Donald Trump from being elected President and to secure Hillary Clinton's election.

Strzok and Page both worked under former FBI Director James Comey during the FBI's investigation of Clinton's emails.

"Lisa and I went to the Federal Bureau of Investigation today to review the materials that were previously produced to Congress relating to her proposed interview, but after waiting for more than three hours, we were not provided with any documents", Jeffress said.

House Judiciary Chairman Robert Goodlatte and House Oversight and Government Reform Chairman Trey Gowdy wrote Jeffress Wednesday evening demanding that Page either appear at the public hearing with Strzok on Thursday or for a private deposition Friday.

England World Cup team will be invited to 10 Downing Street
The Times and The Guardian said it was the "end of the dream" while i said "Southgate's team will still return as heroes after superb World Cup effort".

Republican lawmakers have seized on a text in which Mr. Strzok discusses "an insurance policy" against the president and another in which he vowed to stop Mr. Trump from becoming president as evidence the Mueller investigation is biased.

Earlier he said Page appears to have "something to hide" by not appearing.

The committee had scheduled Page's closed-door testimony one day before Strzok is set to testify publicly before the Judiciary and Oversight committees.

In a letter to the committees' chairmen, they said an inquiry originally billed as reviewing the investigation into Democrat Hillary Clinton's use of a private email server "has morphed into a partisan, abusive, and improper inquisition of Special Counsel Mueller's investigation of President Trump's campaign and its connections to Russian Federation".

Jeffress said in a statement prior to the contempt threat that Page could not appear without first having access to Federal Bureau of Investigation documents that the committees already possessed, and that they had ignored her efforts to find a later date for the deposition. Her attorney said Page hadn't been given enough information about the committees' intended line of questioning.

The Judiciary and Oversight panels have already spent much of the summer holding hearings and interviews critical of the Federal Bureau of Investigation and Justice Department.

Strzok was already interviewed privately by lawmakers on the two committees for 11 hours June 27.

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