Brazil's President Temer calls for FIFA World Cup title

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To help ease fears that it would be too physically challenging, Federation Internationale de Football Association have planned to scrap both the current Club World Cup that takes place in December as well as the Confederations Cup, a tournament which takes place the summer before every World Cup.

The competition would be held every four years and it would replace the current club World Cup competition which takes place on an annual basis and it would also see the removal of the Confederations Cup, which is being proposed to alleviate fears about fatigue for the world's top players.

The new 24 team format would include 12 clubs from Europe, and those who have won three European Cup's will be the first to be invited.

The report indicates that the likes of Chelsea, Manchester City, Arsenal, Atletico Madrid, Paris Saint-Germain, Porto, Benfica and Borussia Dortmund would then be in contention for the three other European places.

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It is reported that Fifa's proposal would see the 24 participating clubs split US$2 billion in prize money, with each club earning a minimum of UK£50 million (US$67.4 million) and the champion pocketing as much as UK£100 million (US$134.8 million). Both UEFA and the Premier League are said to have concerns regarding the new competition.

Infantino says he has an offer of $25 billion over 12 years on the table for the two competitions from a group of investors, which the Financial Times has identified as SoftBank from Japan and the governments of China and Saudi Arabia.

The competition has the potential to be a real game-changer for European club football. Or would they just treat the tournament as a pre-season warm up to get their players ready for the domestic season?

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